Alternative versions of Deadpool

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Alternate versions of Deadpool
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceThe New Mutants #98 (February 1991)
Created byFabian Nicieza
Rob Liefeld
See alsoDeadpool in other media

As a character, Deadpool has appeared in a number of media, from comic books to films and television series. Each version of the work typically establishes its own continuity, and sometimes introduces parallel universes, to the point where distinct differences in the portrayal of the character can be identified. This article details various versions of Deadpool depicted in works including Marvel Comics Ultimate universe and What if issues.

Age of Apocalypse[edit]

In the Age of Apocalypse timeline, Deadpool was redubbed Dead Man Wade and reimagined as a bitter, humorless member of Apocalypse's Pale Riders, having received his flawed healing factor from Apocalypse's eugenics program. Sent with his team to invade the Savage Land, he attempted to unleash chaos upon the sanctuary but was killed by Nightcrawler, who teleported his head off his body and hid it in a crater.[1] Later, Dead Man Wade was revealed to be resurrected like many of the other Alpha mutants.[2]

Captain America: Who Won't Wield the Shield[edit]

The World War II-era version of Deadpool is introduced in the one-shot parody issue Captain America: Who Won't Wield the Shield. Frederick "Wheezy" Wilson, the nephew of President Woodrow Wilson, is a soldier who is experimented on by the Nazis to become 'Veapon X'. Despite the nature of the story as a period piece, Wilson peppers his speech with anachronistic slang from the 1990s.[3][4]

X-Men '92[edit]

In the Secret Wars Battleworld based on the 90s X-Men animated series, Deadpool is a member of X-Force with Cable, Bishop, Archangel, Psylocke, and Domino.[5]

Weapon X: Days of Future Now[edit]

In the alternate Earth ending of the Weapon X comic, Deadpool is recruited by Wolverine to be part of a new team of X-Men after the old team is killed. He joins, claiming Wolverine only wants him as the "token human". This version of Deadpool is killed by Agent Zero's Anti-Healing Factor corrosive acid. This version of Deadpool speaks in white text boxes.[6]

Marvel 2099[edit]

In a potential future taking place in 2099, Deadpool is Warda Wilson, the daughter of Wade and Shiklah. She collaborates with a gang inspired by Hydra Agent Bob and is wanted by the police. She has taken an older Wade prisoner and forces him to watch political debates while chained up, angered that he's ruined her life and hopes she can use him to find her mother. Wade reveals he and Shiklah had a falling out after the death of Ellie, which led to a battle between the two former lovers in Hell.[7] The new Deadpool is also being pursued by a woman who wears a costume that looks like Wade's "Zenpool" identity from Axis. The mysterious woman rescues Wade and gives him access to her bike to a hologram Preston. She then battles Warda and is revealed to be an alive Ellie, who plans to reclaim the Deadpool name.[8] Wade and Preston break into the old hideout of the Uncanny Avengers for Wade to gear up. Warda and Ellie continue fighting until Warda reveals she will unleash a demonic monster unless Ellie does not get Wade to confess where Shiklah is. After Wade and Preston reunite with Ellie, Wade tells Ellie to search for Shiklah's casket at Doc Samson's grave while he and Preston then go to the Little Italy of 2099 to seek the help of one of the few heroes alive in this time period: Iron Fist.[9]

The heroes and Danny's Iron Fists confront Warda in Madison Star Garden, where the Iron Fists fend off the giant monster while Wade tries to prevent his daughters from fighting by promising to tell Warda where Shiklah is. Despite his plea, Warda murders Ellie with liquid napalm and takes Wade to the sewer to interrogate him, where Wade reveals that Ellie's mutant ability is to regenerate all at once into her teenage body, allowing her to survive Warda's attack. After Wade, Preston, and Ellie defeat Warda, Wade tells her that he and Shiklah had an on-and-off-again relationship, but were always on the path for war which eventually resulted in her death, as on Earth, those who refuse to co-exist cease to exist (with Wade bringing up the Skrulls to support his point). He implants Preston into Warda's head so she can aid Warda in clearing her conscious and becoming a better person and tells his daughters that they can both be Deadpool. He later tells Ellie that he now plans to travel the world and rid the planet of his old enemies and that Shiklah's resting place is in a shrunken glass coffin located on top of his heart.[10]

Marvel 2997[edit]

In Messiah War Deadpool is locked in a freezer for eight hundred years. When he escapes he is captured by the armed forces of the few surviving humans left. He helps Cable to get Hope Summers back from Stryfe who is later revealed to be inside this version of Deadpool's head. After seemingly defeating Stryfe, this version of Deadpool is quickly ripped in half and appears to die shortly after, his last words being a joke on "severance" pay.[11]

Marvel Zombies[edit]

In the first Marvel Zombies limited series, a zombie version of Deadpool is seen fighting the Silver Surfer. The zombie Deadpool eventually loses his body and appears as a disembodied head beginning in Marvel Zombies 3. This incarnation of Deadpool, frequently referred to as Headpool, entered the mainstream Marvel continuity when he is encountered and captured by the original Deadpool in Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth.[12] Along with several other alternate versions of Deadpool, Headpool went on to appear in Deadpool Corps with a propeller beanie mounted to his head, granting him flight.[13]

Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth[edit]

Several alternate incarnations of Deadpool are introduced in the series Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth. Attempting to return Headpool to the Marvel Zombies universe, Deadpool encounters multiple versions of himself as they exist in other universes, including a female version of himself named Lady Deadpool, Major Wade Wilson, a militant but sane version of Deadpool, and The Deadpool Kid (KidPool), a cowboy version of Deadpool who exists within a universe resembling the Wild West.[14]

Deadpool Corps[edit]

In the 12-issue series Deadpool Corps and prequel series Prelude to Deadpool Corps, Deadpool is joined by several alternate versions of himself from different universes to create a super-group. Lady Deadpool and Headpool return from their previous appearances in Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth, joined by newcomers Kidpool, a child version of Deadpool who attends Professor X's school,[15] and Dogpool, a dog endowed with Deadpool's familiar healing factor.[16] They are later joined by The Champion, going by the name Championpool.[17] The group was brought together by the Elder of the Universe known as the Contemplator. He brought them together to stop the powerful cosmic being known as the Awerness. The Awerness absorbed entire worlds, devouring the people's consciousnesses.[18]

Ultimate Marvel[edit]

The Ultimate Marvel version of Deadpool is Sergeant "Wadey" Wilson, a Gulf War veteran. Depicted as an anti-mutant extremist, he is a cyborg and leader of the Reavers who hunt mutants for sport on a reality TV show. Beneath the mask, Deadpool appears to be a skull with an exposed brain, his skin formed by a transparent shell. He also has the ability to mimic an individual's appearance and voice, though not their powers.[19] Wadey reappears in Deadpool Kills Deadpool (written by Cullen Bunn and released in 2013) as a member of Evil Deadpool Corps, led by Dreadpool, whose aim was to exterminate alternate versions of Deadpool across the multiverse, including regular Deadpool Corps. In issue #4, he is killed by the mainstream Deadpool.[20] The Ultimate version apparently doesn't have the ability of breaking the fourth wall as the mainstream version does.

Deadpool Pulp[edit]

Deadpool Pulp is a four-issue limited series from writers Mike Benson and Adam Glass and artist Laurence Campbell, with Deadpool set in the 1950s drawing on pulp fiction (similar to the Marvel Noir fictional universe).[21]

Hulked-Out Heroes[edit]

Appearing first in Hulk #21, Deadpool is "hulked-out" near the end of the Fall of the Hulks storyline. A two-part miniseries called, World War Hulks: Hulked Out Heroes followed Hulkpool as he travels back in time to kill himself, disrupting the origin stories of many heroes as he goes.[22]

House of M[edit]

In the House of M reality, Wade Wilson was a field commander and active agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. During one of his missions, Agent Wilson contacted S.H.I.E.L.D. They had to patch him through the TB-Link satellite to communicate with him.[23]

Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe[edit]

In the storyline Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe, the X-Men send Deadpool to a mental hospital for therapy. The doctor treating him is actually Psycho-Man in disguise, who attempts to torture and brainwash Deadpool into becoming his personal minion. The procedure fails, but leaves Deadpool even more mentally unhinged, erasing the "serious" and "Screwball" voices in his head and replacing them with a voice that only wants destruction. Under "Evil Voice's" influence, Deadpool develops a more nihilistic world view and as a result, after killing Psycho-Man by repeatedly smashing him against a desk, he begins assassinating every superhero and supervillain on Earth, starting with the Fantastic Four and even killing the Watcher, in an apparent attempt to rebel against his comic book creators. The book ends with him breaking into the "real" world and confronting the Marvel writers and artists who are writing the book. He says to the reader that once he's done with this universe, "I'll find you soon enough."[24]

Deadpool Killustrated[edit]

After the events of Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe, Deadpool has killed many versions of Marvel superheroes and villains across the multiverse to no effect and comes to a conclusion that infinite alternate versions of the heroes and villains he killed exist.[volume & issue needed] In the series, Deadpool hires a team of scientists to help him get rid of all Marvel characters. The Mad Thinker gives the Merc with a Mouth a device that transports him to the "Ideaverse", a universe that contains the classic characters that inspired Marvel characters.[volume & issue needed] In each book, he hunts down and murders characters such as the Headless Horseman (who inspired the Green Goblin and Ghost Rider), the characters of Little Women (Black Widow, She-Hulk, Elektra), Captain Ahab (General Thunderbolt Ross), the Little Mermaid (Namor), Mowgli (Ka-Zar), Count Dracula (Marvel's Dracula, Morbius, Blade) and more. He also installs his own brain into Frankenstein's monster, giving his dark inner voice a body to help him with.[25] Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson enlist Beowulf, Hua Mulan and Natty Bumppo to stop him.

Deadpool Kills Deadpool[edit]

On April 4, 2013, Cullen Bunn revealed that, after the events of Deadpool Killustrated, the next and last part of the "Deadpool Killology" is Deadpool Kills Deadpool that the murderous, nihilistic Deadpool that appeared in Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe and Killustrated is called "Dreadpool" and, in the series, he hunted down all versions of Deadpool while "our" Deadpool, the light-hearted Merc With A Mouth, hunted down Dreadpool. Bunn stated that the Deadpool Corps appeared along with many other versions of Deadpool and new versions.[citation needed] The first book was released in July 2013. The first issue opens with Deadpool dealing with yet another attack by ULTIMATUM, after which the Deadpool Corps quickly ropes the titular character into the crisis. Over the course the storyline, The Deadpool Corps is killed (not including Headpool, who was already killed prior to the events of the storyline), and it concludes in Issue #4, where Deadpool clashes with Dreadpool, who is eventually shown the error of his ways and killed by Deadpool in vengeance for causing the death of his friends. Somehow, our Deadpool finds his way back, but not before the reader is aware that Evil Deadpool is still alive and scheming.[volume & issue needed]

Gwenpool[edit]

Gwen Poole, or "Gwenpool", is an amalgam of Deadpool and Gwen Stacy. She started as one of 20 variant covers released in June 2015 for the then-current series, which following the popularity of Spider-Gwen saw Gwen Stacy reimagined as other Marvel characters, such as Doctor Strange, Groot and Wolverine.[26] Gwenpool was featured on the variant cover for "Deadpool's Secret Secret Wars #2", which turned out to be especially popular with the fans.[27] After seeing how many fans were cosplaying as a character that wasn't even featured in any comic, Marvel editor Jordan White approached writer Christopher Hastings with a task to create a story around her. Initially the plan was to do the one-shot comic "Gwenpool Special #1", which was then followed by a three-page backup story in the ongoing volume of "Howard the Duck", and eventually an ongoing series, starting in April 2016.[28]

Apocalypse Wars[edit]

In the Extraordinary X-Men Apocalypse Wars crossover, Deadpool is a Horsemen of Apocalypse.[29]

Identity Wars[edit]

When Deadpool, Spider-Man and Hulk went to another universe, Deadpool found Death Wish who looked like Deadpool but the red part of his costume was green. Deadpool and Death Wish started hanging out with each other and having a lot of fun, until Wade Wilson of this universe named Death Mask came in and killed Death Wish who was revealed to be the Victor von Doom of this universe went crazy. Then Deadpool vowed revenge against Death Mask for killing Death Wish and killed all of the members of Death Mask's group. After that Deadpool defeated Death Mask by throwing a bomb at him, which knocked him out. Deadpool started impersonating Death Mask until he and the other Heroes went back to their universe.[30]

Spider-Man & Deadpool[edit]

In an alternate future, Spider-Man is an old man who got paralyzed from an Life Model Decoy Deadpool and lives in a retirement home with an elderly Deadpool. Unknown to Spider-Man, Oldpool was giving his blood to Peter so he wouldn't die due to his old age. In a battle between LMD Deadpools, Oldpool uses a time machine and mistakenly switches places with the mainstream Deadpool. After they got to the main timeline they are reunited with the main Spider-Man and Oldpool. Then after stopping Master Matrix (the LMD master created by Peter's parents) and Chameleon, Old Man Peter and Oldpool fade away to their timeline.

Venomverse[edit]

In Edge of Venomverse, Deadpool from another universe investigated a facility where illegal experiments were being performed with parasitic worms. He bonded to the Venom symbiote to expel the worms inside him. In the event he willingly got consumed by a Poison to act as a double-agent for the Venom army. In the end he is presumed dead.

What If...[edit]

...Iron Man: Demon in an Armor[edit]

In this one-shot, which happens to take place in Earth-90211, Wade Wilson, as Deadpool, is hired by Galactus to kill the Beyonder for merging MODOK to Galactus's rear end in exchange for the Community Cube. He was given a weapon called the Recton Expungifier, the only weapon that could kill the Beyonder. When Deadpool tracked down his target to a night club, he was enticed into the Beyonder's partying lifestyle, getting Jheri curls in the process. While hanging out with the Beyonder in a flying limousine, Spider-Man broke into the car and demanded the symbiote costume be removed from himself. Beyonder's driver shoots Spider-Man out of the limousine, the symbiote leaves Spider-Man and merges with Deadpool, creating Venompool. However, after years of partying, Beyonder grew tired and threw Venompool to the world, snapping him out of the Beyonder's magic. Venompool attempted to resume his contract and kill the Beyonder, but he accidentally pawned the Recton Expungifier. He decides to get himself clean by kidnapping and selling a drunken Tony Stark to A.I.M. Unfortunately, he can't join any major superhero teams, like the Avengers, Defenders and Fantastic Four because of his newly-acquired Jheri curls.

References[edit]

  1. ^ X-Calibre #3, May 1995.
  2. ^ Age of Apocalypse #3.
  3. ^ Stuart Moore, Matt Fraction, Jason Aaron (w), Brendan McCarthy, Joe Quinones, Mirco Pierfederici (p) Captain America: Who WON'T Wield the Shield (April 21, 2010), New York, NY: Marvel Comics.
  4. ^ Nevett, Chad (April 21, 2010). "Captain America: Who Won't Wield the Shield #1". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  5. ^ X-Men '92 #3, July 2015.
  6. ^ Weapon X: Days of Future Present.
  7. ^ Deadpool vol. 4, #6.
  8. ^ Deadpool vol. 4, #12.
  9. ^ Deadpool vol. 4, #19.
  10. ^ Deadpool vol. 4, #25.
  11. ^ Schedeen, Jesse (2009-06-17). "IGN: Cable #15 review". IGN. Retrieved August 21, 2010.
  12. ^ "Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth #1 – Marvel Comics Catalog". Marvel.com. 2009-07-01. Retrieved August 21, 2010.
  13. ^ Deadpool Corps #1.
  14. ^ Deadpool: Merc with a Mouth #7.
  15. ^ Prelude to Deadpool Corps #2.
  16. ^ Prelude to Deadpool Corps #3.
  17. ^ Deadpool Corps Vol #1.
  18. ^ Deadpool Corps #1.
  19. ^ Ultimate Spider-Man #91–94.
  20. ^ Deadpool Kills Deadpool #1–4.
  21. ^ Richards, Dave (June 17, 2010). "Deadpool! Now With Extra Pulp!". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
  22. ^ Rogers, Vaneta (March 26, 2010). "Jeff Parker Debriefs Us on Declassified 'Hulked-Out Heroes'". Newsarama.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  23. ^ New Avengers #45.
  24. ^ Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe #1.
  25. ^ Whiting, Russ (March 28, 2013). "Is It Good? Deadpool Killustrated #3 Review". Adventures in Poor Taste. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  26. ^ "Gwen Takes Over". Marvel.com. 14 April 2015.
  27. ^ Johnston, Rich (August 21, 2015). "And Finally… Has Marvel Noticed That Gwenpool Is A Thing Now?R". BleedingCool.com.
  28. ^ "Marvel announces new Gwenpool series". Entertainment Weekly. December 22, 2015.
  29. ^ Extraordinary X-Men (vol. 1) #8
  30. ^ Incredible Hulk Annual #1

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